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20130831
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remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong. so, in 2012, of this year, we are very lucky enough to have two very distinguished honorees for our distinguished service a word for the city and county of san francisco and the first person we will recognize tonight is vera noon tear if you can please u.s.a. plast she is the social director at the arab culture and community center and she helps hundreds of families in trans by providing social work service and is i know how important that work is and how difficult that work is and i can't thank you enough to ensure that all of our communities are cared
shows us how to take the bikes on the bus, so simple right here on my phone. >> neat. we can finish making travel plans over dinner, now let's go eat. >> how about about that organic vegan gluten free rest rft. >> can't we go to the food truck. >> do you want to walk or take a taxi. >> there is an alert right here telling us there is heavy traffic in soma. >> let's walk there and then take a taxi or muni back. >> that new website gives us a lot of options. >> it sure does and we can use it again next weekend when we go to see the giants. there is a new destination section on the website that shows us how to get to at&t park. >> there is a section, and account alerts and information on parking and all kinds of stuff, it is so easy to use that even you can use it. >> that is smart. >> are you giving me a compliment. >> i think that i am. >> wow, thanks. >> now you can buy dinner. sfmta.com. access useful information, any access useful information, any hello, i'm ivette torres, and welcome to another edition of access useful information, any the road to recovery. today we'll be talking
have to use this microphone here. so, you have to wait till you get the microphone in front of you to ask a question he. * lunch that's the purpose for the audio and stuff. today we're going to talk about -- basically this is what i want to do here. i've been a detective for about six years now and been with the police department 15 years. prior to that i was in the united states army, military police corps. any [speaker not understood] here? just one? prior to that when i went to college i was always looking at graffiti. i'm originally from wisconsin and there's a lot of gang graffiti back when i was growing up. i was interested in looking at it and seeing the messages that were up there. when i got into the phoenix police department, i worked four years on the road and then i started doing school resource officer. the school resource officer for a couple years where i really, really learned about graffiti. in your presentation, it talked about how the schools, schools are big where they start out, okay. [speaker not understood] at home, but school is where they really get starte
of a process to train and teach more people how to use computers. we wanted to showcase a little bit of what folks are learning out there. first, we will show a video, and then wind up -- linda will explain about lunch. i know a few people have slipped over there, but i ask everyone to be quiet for a few minutes. there is plenty to go around. the video we're going to show right now -- ia feeling this morning at 4:00 a.m. that tells you how dedicated people were to be able to produce it and have it here today. i wanted to thank paul grant, who has worked with the project with the family services agency senior community services employment program. you will see his good work here also john boswell, who came in at the last minute and help us pull this together. he did it in exchange for tyne bank hours with the bay area community exchange time bank. if you want to know about that, you can learn about that across the hall after lunch. finally, from the broadband technology opportunity program, which provides opportunities for seniors and people with disabilities to teach each other, to learn fro
of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tennis today. ok. one thing to tell you, there is a little bar on top of the el it picks up the movement of our arms. we're going to face the television as we play. here we go. how many of you are cheering for me? how many of you are cheering for her? what is up with that? [laughter] that is it. you are going down. we're going to play a single game of wii tennis. are you ready? all right. here we go. we're going to get intense. [applause] >> eco dash 15. -- 0-15. [applause] 0-30. >> she is currently destroying me. i will make a comeback. [applause] >> 0-40. >> this is not good. she has t
, they really mean everyone. there are true inspiration for me, fellow canadians, and many of us around the world. the theme of my presentation today is about staying connected her. and if there are two things i am passionate about, it is that. those phrases really sum up the last 20 years of my life in so many ways. and so to explore the themes, what i want to do is share with you some ideas about consciously working on making and the sustaining connections. which is what i think we all need to do. to get started, we will talk a little bit about the technology solution. i want to share with you stories, lessons, and some new ideas. i want to have knowledge all of you that are here today thinking about trying something new. thinking about a new approach to technology, using technology differently. maybe it will be your first time in beijing with a computer. you might feel a little bit like a fish out of water. i really do understand. i am the very last person that anyone in my circle of friends and family would have ever thought would be heading up a tech company. i never thought i woul
? but so difficult to plan for people? there is something that makes us hesitant to reach out to others. some of us can take this idea of independence to an extreme. i think this is probably some place in newfoundland, a remote shore of canada. we have come to believe that reaching out to others is a sign of weakness. was he asking for help and support as a vulnerability instead of a necessary strength. so if you agree with me that connections are the key to a good life, i would like you to explore with me how technology, and in particular, how that works can actually help. i would like to tell you about ties in the online network service. that is installed on every b-top computer in san francisco. this knowledge built on 20 years of connections to secure the future. it creates personal, private, secure online networks. here is what happened personal network looks like. and joe and her daughter created a network together, and what they did, they created a network in part because guildhall has an advance in her experience with cancer, and they wanted to coordinate the care and the connec
'll be talking about prevention and early intervention in behavioral health, promising practices. joining us in our panel today are kristen brennan, executive director, fairfax partnership for youth, fairfax, virginia; dr. richard brown, professor of family medicine, school of medicine and public health, university of wisconsin, madison, wisconsin; gail ritchie, public health analyst, center for mental health services, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. pierluigi mancini, ceo, clinic for education, treatment, prevention, and addiction, inc., norcross, georgia. pierluigi, between 2002 and 2011, the total number of adolescents that received prevention messages through the media went from 83.2 percent in 2002 and 75.1 percent on 2011. are we reaching enough young people with prevention messages? well, i think the question is how are we trying to reach the youth with prevention messages? i think that the development of technology today has given us an opportunity that we haven't quite caught up with. t
to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor gavin newsome, particularly, who really had an affection for this building. he saw the design. he saw the potential. he wanted to make sure that that building got built. and he said, do what you need to do, but please, if you can make that building work, we need to have that building in civic center. >> i happened to be at a green conference santa clara. he said
and it can go wherever it wants to go? everyone who has donated to it could use it, host it, share it. >> for quite a great deal of team she was hired in 2005, she struggled with finding the correct and appropriate visual expression. >> it was a bench at one point. it was a darkened room at another point. but the theme always was a theme of how do we call people's attention to the issue of speci species extinction. >> many exhibits do make long detailed explanations about species decline and biology of birds and that is very useful for lots of purposes. but i think it is also important to try to pull at the strings inside people. >> missing is not just about specific extinct or endangered species. it is about absence and a more fundamental level of not knowing what we are losing and we need to link species loss to habitat loss and really focuses much on the habitat. >> of course the overall mission of the academy has to do with two really fundamental and important questions. one of which is the nature of life. how did we get here? the second is the challenge of sustainability. if we a
works very hard with the port staff. in the port's waterfront land use plan, our blueprint for the 7-1/2 miles of waterfront, we make a conscious effort to plan and maintain open access for the benefit of our residents and our visitors. and the port now has 86 acres of open space which is about 10% of the port property. and our ongoing plan can youxv for increasing this amount to 28 acres within the next eight years. so, this is not the beginning or the end, but we're in the midst of what we're trying to do. but as you know, you heard from all the other speakers, providing open space is a very expensive undertaking. in the past 13 years, the port has spent approximately 109 million on public spaces. and we've been able to do this, as you heard various sources of funding, but we want to acknowledge in particular today the tax payers of san francisco that have passed the two general obligation bonds in 2008 and 2012 that have made our open space programs possible. and our partnership, as i said earlier, with our local, state, and federal agencies. this important project is also about o
issues are the easy fixes. the small print, hard to use a mouse, all of that is very easy to fix. the learning curve issues are really the hard ones for most people. most seniors and don't have a tool box of strategies for dealing with technology. we were more able to figure things out. i may not know where the downloads folder is, but i know it exists. i might have trouble finding it, but i know it is there. for someone that doesn't speak technology as well as i do, they don't know how to look for it. if you are someone i have an analogy for you. how many people here can drive? you will be happy to know i do not. for all of you who drive, have you rented cars? when you rent a car, you get into a car you are unfamiliar with. how did you drive it? you do not know where everything is. you do not know where the high beam indicator is or where the turn signals are or any of those kind of things, but you know they are there. you have the language to drive that car because you know what to look for. you know every car has turn signals, so you are going to look for it. when my parents b
the subject with the graffiti that they've done just by using those two things basically. let's try it. first guy we did was ultra here. he didn't have a lot. it was more for these slap tags. but he did about 125 incidences in the city of phoenix. not a big one, but it's just enough to start me out to try to get something. he was an adult and he served 36 days in jail doing city. i didn't get enough to get a felony count on that, but that was my first attempt at getting a felony. i heard some people in here, san francisco, $450 is the damage limit for a felony, 400? phoenix or arizona it's a thousand. okay. it used to be 250 years ago and they moved it up to a thousand. so, it's a little bit harder for us to get -- if i got him down to $97 0 in damage, i almost got him. [laughter] >> but this is the way we started, though. ultra was my very first big case instead of doing these little tagers every so often. you guys investigating graffiti crimes, you see a tager come across. once in a while, what the hell is this, ultra again? ultra again? * this is how we started. * tagger look at different
daughter using the mobile application to update people on the go. you have the neighbor that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want to connect through video. i want to share with you a few things that users are saying at telling us about their experience. 91% says that it helps them share information. that is the number one thing that people providing support to us want. 80% says that it strengthens connections. how can using something on-line actually make u
, they are going to find value with it and use it and be productive with it every day. and half of the city's population that's in the other boat is disconnected from all that potential prosperity. >> we really need to promote content and provide applications that are really relevant to people's lives here. so a lot of the inspiration, especially among the immigrant community, we see is communications with people from their home country but we as much want to use the internet as a tool for people to connect within the local san francisco community. >> i think it's our job as public educators to give them this access and give them this opportunity to see that their efforts are being appreciated beyond their immediate reach. >> you have to blend this idea of community network with computer equipment with training and with support. we can pull all that together, then we've got it. >> it's as much about social and economic justice -- in fact it's more about social and economic justice than just bec to do make change in this community that i using the community. citizen engagement is the key an
technology companies that point to experience not only the use of technology but also express their compassion for the city in giving back to a city that's helped them be successful. today, we have four very special sponsors and thank you for keeping your rates down. sprint for keeping us communicated prima facia. and virgin mobile and assurance wireless. their not only sponsors here but have brought anti volunteers and every time we get those opportunities you know what it's like first year perhaps for the first time looking somebody in the eye and saying i care about where you're going and i don't want you to necessarily live the rough-and-tumble street life. get some she felt and food and take a moment and think about what's happening next week. we care about your background. we know there may not be other supporters in your life. we care about you a because we know about life and want to share >> compassion in san francisco. this is what project homeless is all about and hopefully with that opportunity something might occur where someone says i want to do something for my
, they do not have a way to show us, then this work is only staying here inside and nobody knows the brilliance and the amazing work that the students are doing. >> the term has changed over time from a very basic who has a computer and who doesn't have a computer to now who has access to the internet, especially high speed internet, as well as the skills and the knowledge to use those tools effectively. . >> the city is charged with coming up with digital inclusion. the department of telecommunications put together a 15 member san francisco tech connect task force. we want the digital inclusion program to make sure we address the needs of underserved vulnerable communities, not communities that are already very tech savvy. we are here to provide a, b and c to the seniors. a stands for access. b stands for basic skills and c stands for content. and unless we have all three, the monolingual chinese seniors are never going to be able to use the computer or the internet. >> a lot of the barrier is knowledge. people don't know that these computers are available to them, plus they don
through video. i want to share with you a few things that users are saying at telling us about their experience. 91% says that it helps them share information. that is the number one thing that people providing support to us want. 80% says that it strengthens connections. how can using something on-line actually make us feel closer or more connected to our friends and family? out it works, the more connected the leafy zero with the more information we have. if any of you have grandchildren living far away, if they know that you have recently been to the theater or play cards with friends or had a family dinner, they feel more connected to you and telling the you have been to the doctor and all of those things. this is the way that technology can help people) distant connect with us. 75% of our users say that we work with others to provide care and support. today, ties is three years old, and we have learned a lot about lessons with the good life. our number-one lesson is that no one should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers
the h1 b visa which means allowing both people can go to singapore and go to the u.s. to work and they never have a problem and they can stay here for long. why is there an exception to >> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports
and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce
likewise us to have that conversations and it's with you the volunteers we get this special opportunity to do that. i want to say from the bottom of my heart and as the representative for all san francisco thank you, thank you, thank you for all you're great work, bring forgot the love of this city and make sure we continue with generations of other people we've got to continue being helpful and this is what san francisco is all about. thank you for being great san franciscans (clapping) >> as we think of our 50th event we think about what the mayor said this is a city of compassion. there have been 23 though volunteers that help the needs of the homeless in this city. 3 thousand. if you do the math that's 1 out of every san franciscan has been involved and have been involved with the homeless in our community. that is something that no other city can boost and that comes from the top down. when we think about what our city has to over one of the you biggest things we have is people who are ill maybe they're on the street from diabetes. last week, i saw a man who said i've worked for 2
when they call. we address the calls accordingly. we tend to use the numbers favorably. >> back to what this chief said, i certainly understand the fact that staffing drives a lot of this and i think it would be useful for us given where we are in terms of staffing to have a conversation of what would it take in terms of resources to get to the right amount of staffing prior to 18 if that's where we are now and talking about making changes that could expand hours i'm sure this community could be very interested in working with the police department to get to that point, 2018 is a long time. but i think that to expedited the right result with staffing, there are things we can do right now. we are undermining our own efforts to grow the economy and hopefully we don't have to wait to have those conversations. >> okay. berry, did you want to say something? >> supervisor really hit on it fairly quickly as well. that is i was just going to ask chief sur if there is anything that our industry can do to expedited the staffing and the resources that might be needed to help in light of the econom
in san francisco. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about the organization. >> we're 30 years old now. we started with 14 farmers, and it has grown out to over 80. >> what is the mission of the organization? >> this area has no grocery store spiller it is all mom-and- pop stores. we have this because it is needed. we knew it was needed. and the plaza needed somebody. it was empty. beautiful with city hall in the background. >> thank you for speaking with us. are you on the web? >> yes, hocfarmersmarket.org. >> check them out. thank you. >> welcome. the dish is ready. >> it looks and smells amazing. >> thank you. it was not easy to meet the $20 budget. i checked everybody out and found some great produce. really lovely seafood. i think that you are going to love it. >> do not be shy. cyou know this can run you $35 to $45 for a bowl, so it is great you did this for $20. >> this will feed four to six people. >> not if you invite me over for dinner. i am ready to dig in. >> i hope you'll love it. >> mmm. >> what do you think? >> i think i am going to need more. perhaps you c
level. those phone calls are not used to be treated with respect and the fact you're doing that can be life changing p i'm proud to be part of this event. i want to thank you you're making san francisco the city of hope for so many people. so thank you >> thank you supervisor campos. you know, i've been taught your blessed whether argue blessing. today, we're blessed when we see people giving up their day so thank you to you guys. let's give ourselves a round of applause for coming out today. i have have list of people i want to thank but one of the first, we have the ceo and forgive me if i'm saying your name wrong. thank you so much for participating today they'll helped us expand our mental and dental team so people can get the best services as they move into permanent housing so thank you. i want to thank alex. he's been obviously from the beginning that. one of the founders. anytime i need something i say we need a little bit of extra money for socks. all the things you do thank you sf city for snanlt helping. one of the things it sf city is it doing for us is anything who joi
'll see you next year. and now we invite you to join us in north light park for a fantastic of food and wine for you to enjoy. thank you all very much. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> welcome to the department of building inspections brown bag lunch series. we are very pleased to have a look at the stuff we're always talking about which is how things get built. we are here in the middle of a construction site in san francisco, mercy housing, being built between night and 10th, between market and mission streets. we have all of the people who are part of the project, including the contractors, the design engineers, soil engineers, structural folks. i think we should start by asking the question, what is a high-rise building? what -- what makes this different from any other building? we have the architect for this project. this is actually two projects? >> that is correct. we are building a little over 100 units, hud found it, affordable housing. there is a community center, child development center, a youth center, and there are a couple of retail spaces, the tenant of which is still to be determined
will be stranded and forced to use taxis. this adds 5 hundred miles of auto traffic and another 3 hundred and 25 cars and a taxis driving and parking downtown near union square. there are no benefits from the t e p instead we add 2 hundred and 25 metric tons of greenhouse gas. it's a negative impact on san francisco's goal for a green city. will they're there be a cost savings. the number 3 is not the most under used lines. thirty to 35 have lower use and 20 of the lines have lower use in the night time hours. the eir plans to expand buses on the number 2 and 22 and 34. if 50 percent of our riders go over to their buses they would have to add considerable 76 percent of the eliminated buses would have to add and that's a case of robbing he peter to help paul. we'll be hurting those who cannot afford cars and the elderly and hurt those people who can't afford to hire taxis and sealed it will push those people who are doing the right thing for the environment by taking the bus thank you. >> thank you. good afternoon, commissioners i live on jackson street. isn't there a positive fix to this? rather
in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is wherl of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to deal with the sometimes imperfections in city government. to figure it out, where it is we need to take risks, we are we can be more entrepreneurial, where we can be more transparent and frank little more accountable to all of you as the residents and as our customers here in city government. and this is why i am proud tomorrow to help move forward legislation that my staff has been working closely with jay nath and mayor leon that will real i do three things. first of all, it will create a chief data officer because we need one person who is responsible and accountable for moving forward our open data agenda. secondly, we're going to require every department in the city to have a representative who is respon
of the city and you've been given a letter from us that says there is a new check out bag ordinance. you have some questions. ~ mr. hatch is going to share with you all the ins and outs of the new ordinance. when he's done, from the [speaker not understood] program is going to step up to give a presentation. and for that one i'd like you to sit back and picture yourself as a homeowner of san francisco or tenant in san francisco dealing with issues of what products to help -- to bring into the home to clean that are going to be less toxic to their families. so, because of that we're not here today to present on the campaign overall. this is really just about the messaging. i also do want to acknowledge that both the presentations of materials that come in multiple languages, these two are in english. but you'll see examples in the presentations of some of our collateral that's done in chinese, spanish, we have some russian tagalog, vietnamese. we're trying to cover our bases as far as multi-lingual cases go. without further ado, i'd like to bring up mr. hatchet to discuss the check out bag ord
). >> so they were forced to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches
a different interpretation. although i hope after today's presentation he will agree with us. today the zoning and strar does not find it as part of the same formula. this is just an interpretation. it's a judgment call. to understanding this interpretation several of us got together and contacted the zoning administrator on a conference call. he did name examples that would be formula. he acknowledged the fact before us that the real life in asset saturday and kate spade would be in both names. i ask the zone is administrator about a hypothetical. i asked if starbucks coffee decided to start a tea store for the store used blue instead of green, starbucks has green stores, instead of the mermaid logo, it had a dragon and sold no coffee, the look would be different, the color scheme would be different. despite these differences the zoning administrator readily agree that starbucks tea would be accounted for as starbucks. that entirely independent businesses who share no common ownership structure at all could be coming together as formula even if it was zero coordination among them. if entirely
master comes in at te time that it is changing. we also have clock watchers across the street who tell us if it is off by a second, so he is very attached to the clock. >> we have a clock master. and look at this, the hands of the clock. look how big they are. the holy mackerel. nobody is up here. but this. it the great seal of the state of california. this is a wonderful mosaic. >> it is wonderful. it was original to the building. tens of thousands of people cross by every day. this is the waiting area. the larger alcoves or for storage. and the big plants that would go out to meet the ferries. people would come out to meet the ferries. and then go to the trolley cars. the family of the original artisan still lives in the bay area and they come by every so often to make sure that it is in tact and being taken care of. furry little repair to it. this is the before and after, 1910 to 1960's, 1970's. this is what the building looked like during that time. it was under plywood and carpeting for about 30 years. this was amazingly preserved underneath all of that when it pulled up. >> how to t
're happy you joined us for a town hall with mayor ed lee with the obama administration on the action on immigration founded here just a few blocks away. that what matters is we have a mare that understands the issues a nearest and dear it to us and that's immigration reform. since it's inception we've gotten over 20 visas alone and the feeling is we have a shortage on green talent when we need to go through the steps we need to go through and for the tech community we're focused on opening up our technical school to the global community. we're in a talent war along with a state war on services gov. and anything we can help to create change here means so much to us. we have the mayor who can creative impact so we stand behind mayor ed lee and we're thrilled he's here. i'm so excited to here what he is has to say. thank you (clapping) >> julia and kevin a thank you for being subpoena great community leaders were we're going to have a robust town meeting this is being live for my radio program. we like to let people know in advance. i'm going to ask a few questions then we're going to
is items like one a and e requests for additional use operations continued until september 6th. and the next items request for conditional use operations this proposed until cement 26. those are all the items i have and i have no speaker cards >> are there any public comments. seeing none, public comment is closed >> move to continue items one and 2 to september 26th. second >> on that motion (calling names) so move commissioners that passes and places you under our consent calendar all matters are considered to be routine. there will be no separate discussion of those items unless so requested. and then it will be removed and credit card for a separate hearing. at 524 howard street request for conditional use authorization and 25 d at the 999 brandon street and item 5 for case 20.12 c at the 1097 howard street request for conditional operation. those are all under your consent calendar and i have no speaker cards >> any public comment? >> i assume that my consent item was pulled off. i put my item on the consent calendar because i didn't have the long report. i will withd
torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now
which involved 22 participating nations and this offered us a venue to be able to conduct a humanitarian and disaster relief exercise with all the different partners that we had together and collaborating with this exercise, this offered a perfect opportunity for us to introduce the military capabilities and interaction in exchange with our civil military partners as well. the exercise was located on oh oahu we had used that island as a fictitious island of chianti where we wanted to do a humanitarian response but it also provided us an avenue for the state-wide partners, the civil hawaiian partners, to be able to exercise their exercise as well. this exercise also allowed us the opportunity to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military
out it talk to us about what you do and the love with which you do it. we appreciate your time here on quick bites. i hope you've enjoyed our delicious tale of defendant 93 and dessert. as for me, my search is over. those reviews did not lie. in fact, i'm thinking of one of my very own. some things you just have it experience for yourself. to learn more about anthony's cookies, visit him on the web at anthoniescookies.com. if you want to watch some of our other episodes at sfquickbites/tumbler.com. see >> hi, i'm lawrence corn field. welcome to building san francisco. we have a special series, stay safe. we're looking at earthquake issues. and today we're going to be talking with a residential building owner about what residential building owners and tenants can and should do before earthquakes and after earthquakes. ♪ ♪ >> we're here at this wonderful spur exhibit on mission street in san francisco and i have with me today my good friend george. thanks for joining me, george. and george has for a long time owned residential property here in san francisco. and we want to t
, you are familiar with the public wants that sits behind us. >> usually, i sailed out of south harbor pier 40. there are very few places along the whole bay waterfront or there is public access. right up the street at pier 1 1/2 is a brand new public launch or you can pull in a boat up to 40 feet, spend hours, and it is a wonderful thing. whoever did that, thank you. >> it is a public/private partnership that was done with the port redevelopment. we hope to be putting in more of that type of facility up and down the waterfront as part of a collection of smaller facilities that may someday be used by a water taxi. >> excellent. is there any major change or vision for the plaza behind here? >> we're just starting to look at phase two of the downtown ferry terminal, looking at how we will accommodate three times as many ferry passengers. we will look at this plaza, how we best make use of it. how can a complement the ferry building and a much higher weight than it does now, and also a place where people want to be. that will be part of the upcoming study. >> we have all these various use
the use but also led to the development of the freeway in front of the ferry building, which in 1989 was damaged by the earthquake and demolished. lo and behold, we have a ferry building again after the earthquake? >> we have seen the city come around. the building was renovated and opened in 2003. at the downtown ferry terminal was expanded in 2009 perry -- in 2009. people are looking for other ways to cross the bay. they have found that the use of the ferry boats may have increased by three times it is today. >> a lot of people who are looking for alternative ways to get around, people who walk, bicycle, other transportation, less people are driving. it is not just the price of gas. >> it is fun to ride to work and along the riverfront. we see that on the weekend. the promise not it is just full of people coming down, just walking along the waterfront, ride a bike, take a walk. we're becoming one of the most public waterfronts in the country. >> once upon the time, the boats would come in here where we are standing we know that because i have a photograph of that. my wife c
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